Interviews

October 10th, 2019

Psychologist disseminates autism research, best practices

By Catherine Robertson Souter

According to the Centers for Disease Control, one in 59 children will be diagnosed with autism, many by age four. This number has grown over the past few decades, perhaps because of greater recognition or to changes made in the diagnostic criteria. And, right along with the increase in prevalence, the amount of research being done on the disorder has expanded. But, as is typical with research in many fields, the path from the laboratory to the clinician’s office is not always a straight line. Getting that information out to organizations, schools, and practitioners is key, said Cynthia M. Anderson, [More]

August 26th, 2019

Q&A with Robert Jamison, PhD

By Catherine Robertson Souter

With the crusade against the over-prescription of opioids, medical professionals are finding it difficult to ascertain if and when they should ever prescribe the medications to clients. The chief psychologist at the Pain Management Center of Chestnut Hill, Mass., Robert Jamison,Ph.D has worked with pain management for close to 30 years and has witnessed the rise and fall of opioids as the go-to medication for treatment. As his team realized how detrimental the drugs could be to some patients, they began to search for a way to predict just who may be at risk for abusing opioids and to see [More]

May 28th, 2019

Psychologist delves into emotion, brain development

By Catherine Robertson Souter

In one of the most watched TED talk videos of 2018, Northeastern University Professor of Psychology Lisa Barrett, Ph.D explained how the jury who condemned the surviving Boston Marathon bomber to death was working from a false premise. The jury, she said, passed the sentence, in part, because they felt they couldn’t read remorse in the man’s face. While not looking to debate his guilt or sentence, Barrett used it as an example of how we misunderstand emotion and how it is expressed. Barrett, also director of the interdisciplinary affective science laboratory at Northeastern, is the recipient of numerous awards [More]

May 12th, 2019

Walden’s CEO combines clinical background with business skills

By Catherine Robertson Souter

In the country’s convoluted health care system, forging a path towards recovery can be frustrating at best and a setup for failure at worst. A patchwork system, grown organically over the years as need arises or funding is available, US health care encompasses a wide variety of services, both public and private, for and not-for-profit. It can be overwhelming for individuals trying to navigate and find help for themselves or  loved ones, especially for mental health services. With its whole person approach, Walden Behavioral Care, a Waltham, Massachusetts-based mental health care system that specializes in treating eating disorders, looks to [More]

March 26th, 2019

Couples face challenges but long for love, security

By Catherine Robertson Souter

Healthy marriages are good for everyone involved – the couple, of course, but also the rest of the family, the community, colleagues… everyone benefits. But, with a reported 50% of marriages ending in divorce, the on-going need for couples therapists seems like a niche that will never be fully filled. Just in time for Valentine’s Day, New England Psychologist’s Catherine Robertson Souter had a chat with Robert L. Miller, Ph.D, a clinical psychologist with a practice in Cambridge and Stoneham, Massachusetts about his work with couples and how it has changed over the past several decades. A supervisor in the [More]

March 9th, 2019

Q & A with Laurie Santos, Ph.D, Yale associate professor of psychology

By Catherine Robertson Souter

Research in happiness attracts attention from wide audience. Today’s young adults are experiencing stress and mental health problems at levels we haven’t seen before. The good news is that they seem to be reaching out for answers and help. According to the Center for Collegiate Mental Health, counseling centers at colleges saw a 30-40 percent increase of utilization in the five years before 2015 even though enrollment was up by only five percent. Beyond crisis care, students also appear interested in finding the intersection between a successful life and a happy life as evidenced by the popularity of a course [More]

January 6th, 2019

Long-time columnist shares insight, experiences in new book

By Catherine Robertson Souter

They say that it’s best to write what you know and let the bigger truths come from the personal ones. When Alan Bodnar, PhD, began writing for this publication’s predecessor, Massachusetts Psychologist in 1993, the plan was to shine a light on the life of a practicing psychologist and his relationships with his clients at institutions where he worked. Over the past 25 years, however, as hospitals and agencies shifted and expansion led to New England Psychologist, he discovered that his columns were helping him understand that he was talking about more than one professional’s experiences in and outside of [More]

October 5th, 2018

Psychologist Ashley Warhol, Psy.D finds job at Devereux fulfilling

By Catherine Robertson Souter

As the saying goes, find a job you like and you will never work a day in your life. Psychologists, more than most people, are aware of the need to find meaning in the day to day. For some, however, finding their passion generally takes a long time. For others, it comes more quickly. For Ashley Warhol, Psy.D, finding her niche as director of clinical services and internship training at Devereux Advanced Behavioral Health flowed naturally, and quickly, from a predoctoral internship with the organization in 2012. Following the internship, she was offered a position as a staff clinician, moved [More]

August 30th, 2018

Developmental trauma disorder is focus of research

By Catherine Robertson Souter

It would surprise no one that children who have been mistreated or have been subjected to another form of trauma would experience repercussions. It makes sense that trauma can result in symptoms that look like behavioral disorders, oppositional defiant disorders, anxiety, depression, or ADHD. Yet, for many children the symptoms are treated as not being related to their traumatic experiences. As part of an on-going research project, Julian D. Ford, Ph.D, A.B.P.P., professor of psychiatry and law at the University of Connecticut and director of the Center for Trauma Recovery and Juvenile Justice, and colleagues Joseph Spinazzola, Ph.D. and Bessel [More]

July 6th, 2018

Researcher Nicole Overstreet, Ph.D., focuses on concerns of women, marginalized groups

By Catherine Robertson Souter

Until recently, medical and psychological research was done with a “one-size-fits-all” approach – white men around the age of 35 made up the majority of research subject pools and findings were then extrapolated to apply to women, other ethnic groups, children and the elderly. Researchers began to question standard practices as concerns rose around the over-medication of children by using much larger test subject prescriptions. Also playing a role was the realization that symptoms of the same illness may differ between men and women and that certain treatment regimens work differently for different ethnic populations. There’s been a shift towards [More]