Interviews

May 28th, 2019

Psychologist delves into emotion, brain development

By Catherine Robertson Souter

In one of the most watched TED talk videos of 2018, Northeastern University Professor of Psychology Lisa Barrett, Ph.D explained how the jury who condemned the surviving Boston Marathon bomber to death was working from a false premise. The jury, she said, passed the sentence, in part, because they felt they couldn’t read remorse in the man’s face. While not looking to debate his guilt or sentence, Barrett used it as an example of how we misunderstand emotion and how it is expressed. Barrett, also director of the interdisciplinary affective science laboratory at Northeastern, is the recipient of numerous awards [More]

November 8th, 2018

Study gives insight into how people experience emotion

By Phyllis Hanlon

Emotions run the gamut, from sadness and grief to happiness and euphoria and many others in between. But little is known about how and why those emotions change at different times and during different stages of life. A team of researchers at Harvard University recently conducted a study to explore these questions. Leah Somerville, Ph.D, associate professor psychology, and director, Affective Neuroscience and Development Lab, oversaw the study, which involved 143 subjects between the age of five and 25. Clinical psychologist graduate student Erik Nook, the “resident expert” on this work – according to Somerville – has long been interested [More]

February 9th, 2018

Painting a life

By Alan Bodnar Ph.D.

When you reach a certain age and start thinking about retirement, you will get plenty of advice about how to stay healthy and mentally sharp when you stop working at the job that defined your career for most of your adult life. One thing you will hear over and over again is the importance of learning something new – a new language, skill, hobby or maybe even a whole new career. Lately, I’ve been learning about painting. To be clear about this statement, I am not actually taking art lessons and, while I enjoy doodling as much as the next [More]