Articles, Leading Stories

October 1st, 2016

Schools focus on underlying trauma

By Phyllis Hanlon

Residential schools serve as a viable alternative for children with behavioral and emotional issues not adequately addressed in a traditional academic setting. Students present with a variety of issues that range from depression and anxiety to attention deficit disorder and substance abuse and many others in between. In recent years, research and clinical care has shifted away from treating just the diagnosis and now address the underlying trauma that might be at the heart of the child’s problems. Joseph Spinazzola, Ph.D., vice president, Behavioral Health and Trauma Services at the Justice Resource Institute, professor of practice in the department of [More]

October 1st, 2016

Graduate programs fail to address torture issue

By Janine Weisman

Has the backlash against the participation of military psychologists in harsh interrogations of detainees at Guantánamo Bay Detention Center during the Bush era prompted U.S. doctoral programs in clinical psychology to do more ethics training to prepare graduate students for their careers? Not according to a new study by researchers at Lesley University, Cambridge Health Alliance/Harvard Medical School and other institutions. They sharply criticize the American Psychological Association for encouraging military psychologists to assist with interrogations and subsequently failing to require or even encourage training programs to prepare psychologists to navigate situations where there are conflicting duties to follow orders [More]

October 1st, 2016

Programs demonstrate alternative approaches to care

By Catherine Robertson Souter

We live in a rapidly evolving world where state-of-the-art quickly becomes yesterday’s news. Beyond tech developments, progress has become the hallmark of everything from efficient appliances to educational tools. The same can be said for mental health care. As health care has turned to more holistic approaches, from “prescribing” stress reduction and exercise to combining physical and mental health services under one roof, alternative methods of psychological care are also taking center stage. In some cases, a backlash against what some consider the over-prescribing of medication has fueled a turn towards clinical treatment that incorporates more community/family approaches to care. [More]

October 1st, 2016

Study: Women military members at risk for mental health woes

By Janine Weisman

Combat exposure increased the odds of Army enlisted women returning from Afghanistan or Iraq of developing post-deployment behavioral health problems, according to a new study led by a Brandeis University researcher. Active duty and National Guard/Reserve enlisted women had a similar prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression and at-risk drinking, reports the study published in the August issue of the Journal of Traumatic Stress. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs projects women will account for 18 percent of the veteran population by 2035, the fastest growing group. But research on military populations has generally focused on the entire population, which [More]

October 1st, 2016

Minibikes used as learning tool for kids, teens

By Pamela Berard

A Boston-based nonprofit aims to help boys and girls ages 10-17 develop self esteem and a sense of belonging by using a minibike as a motivational tool and a metaphor for personal development. The National Youth Project Using Minibikes (NYPUM) began in 1969 and is supported by Honda Motor Co. Inc. and run by Robert F. Kennedy Children’s Action Corps. Approximately 35 programs nationwide – including municipalities, residential and school-, faith- and community-based – participate in the recreational program, which has an integral mentoring component that guides and supports youth to make good decisions at school, home and in their [More]

October 1st, 2016

Munchausen by Internet cases increase

By Rivkela Brodsky

Munchausen by Internet – a syndrome where a person pretends to have a medical condition using the Internet as a tool in this deception – is on the rise, said Marc D. Feldman, M.D., clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of Alabama who coined the term in 2000, although it is not recognized as a disorder in the DSM-5. He says since he published an article first describing this condition, he has been contacted about 120 cases, which he said “has got to be the tip of the iceberg because people are having to make some effort to reach [More]

October 1st, 2016

CDC studies health risks of LGB students

By Pamela Berard

Lesbian, gay, and bisexual students experience a higher level of physical and sexual violence and bullying than other students, according to a recently released national report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The report, “Sexual Identity, Sex of Sexual Contacts, and Health-Related Behaviors Among Students in Grades 9-12 – United States and Selected Sites, 2015” is the CDC’s first nationally representative study on the health risks of U.S. LGB high school students. The report was made possible by the CDC for the first time adding questions to ascertain both sexual identity and sex of sexual contacts, to the [More]

October 1st, 2016

Eating disorders: better addressed at specialized centers

By Phyllis Hanlon

Residential schools are designed to provide therapy and education for students with a range of behavioral and emotional issues as well as learning, psychological and psychiatric disorders. In the past, many of these schools also addressed eating disorders, but treatment for this condition appears to be moving away from the residential school setting. David J. Alperovitz, Psy.D., staff psychologist at the Klarman Eating Disorder Center at McLean Hospital, noted that several new centers focused on eating disorders have opened in recent years. “Ten to 15 years ago, there were not as many,” he said, adding that because adolescents today deal [More]

October 1st, 2016

WHO proposes removing transgender from diagnosis list

By Phyllis Hanlon

In recent years, society has witnessed a number of changes related to the transgender population that are leading, for the most part, to some semblance of acceptance. In July, the World Health Organization added its voice to the discussion when it proposed the declassification of transgender identity as a mental disorder in its next version of the International Classification of Diseases-11. A study out of Columbia University lends support to the move. Geoffrey M. Reed, Ph.D., professor in the department of psychiatry at Columbia University, conducted a study at a transgender health services clinic in Mexico City. He interviewed 250 [More]

October 1st, 2016

Yale study looks at sub threshold PTSD co morbidity risks

By Susan Gonsalves

According to research, veterans who do not have full blown PTSD but who experience some symptoms are at a heightened risk for depression, suicide and substance abuse. They could benefit from screening and treatment in clinical settings but are overlooked. That was the takeaway of a Yale-university led study, published in the World Psychiatry Journal’s June issue. The research looked at 1,484 veterans nation-wide ranging in age from 20 to 94 with a median age of 64 and found that 22.1 percent experienced “sub threshold” PTSD while eight percent met the DSM-5 criteria for a PTSD diagnosis. In addition, these [More]

Site Developed by SteerPoint Design