Leading Stories

November 1st, 2010

Work ‘addiction’ on the rise?

By Ami Albernaz

We all know someone we could classify as a workaholic – maybe that person works 70-hour weeks or never seems to take a vacation. Now, the topic of work addiction – working excessively and working compulsively – is receiving more attention, partly because of stresses it can place on family life and on physical and mental health. Although people might be skeptical about whether work addiction really exists – after all, some people have to work long hours or simply enjoy working – the defining characteristic is working to relieve feelings of anxiety or guilt that come from not working. [More]

November 1st, 2010

Study: Are insomnia medications effective for children?

By Ami Albernaz

Despite uncertainty about the safety and efficacy of insomnia medication for children, a new survey finds that child psychiatrists endorse using medication in at least one-quarter of their patients. The study’s authors are recommending the clinical trials be used to learn how effective sleep medications are for children, what the optimal doses are and how the drugs affect mood and daytime functioning. The findings, reported in the August issue of Sleep Medicine, are based on responses from nearly 1,300 members of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Insomnia is a significant clinical issue among many school-aged child and [More]

November 1st, 2010

Talk therapy on the decline, study says

By Pamela Berard

Talk therapy is on the decline, while more Americans with mental health conditions are being treated with drugs alone, according to a new study. The results, reported in the American Journal of Psychiatry, are based on data from government health surveys conducted in 1998 and 2007. The percentage of Americans who said they’d had at least one psychotherapy session in the past year remained just over three percent in 1998 (3.37) and 2007 (3.18). However, those being treated with drugs alone rose from 44.1 to 57.4 percent in that span; combined treatments (drugs and psychotherapy) declined from 40 to 32.1 [More]

November 1st, 2010

Introspection, respect, heals youth drug addiction at CASTLE

By Jennifer E Chase

Self respect, and the respect we elicit from family and peers, is often the common missing denominator among kids who use drugs to salve pain. A program in Brockton, Mass., with a regal-sounding name is teaching patients to restore the missing tenet of respect as the first step toward healing from drug addiction. CASTLE stands for “Clean and Sober Teens Living Empowered,” and its foundation is based on a model that combines neuroscience with familial therapeutic practices to build the self esteem adolescents typically fill with drugs’ euphoria. Two years ago, this short-term residential rehab program opened for patients ages [More]

November 1st, 2010

Learn to Cope becomes addiction‘school’ for parents

By Jennifer E Chase

She’ll probably downplay the whole thing by saying it started by accident. She’ll probably tell you that the majority of the site is written by her only because she likes to write. But, the picture gets bigger when you learn what started as a one-woman support group for parents with kids addicted to opiates now has five chapters that meet as many days each week or that her Web site learn2cope.com has a 1,700-member online forum. And when she tells you she was trying to help her son find recovery, but she ended up finding herself, you don’t need to [More]

November 1st, 2010

Early detection equals improved outcomes even for psychosis

By Nan Shnitzler

At Massachusetts General Hospital’s First-Episode and Early Psychosis Program (FEPP), they like to say, forget what you know about schizophrenia. “People think about schizophrenia as this awful thing,” says Corinne Cather, Ph.D., a FEPP clinical psychologist. “It’s not a great thing, but we can improve the trajectory of schizophrenia where people can get better.” FEPP helps patients and their families cope with a first episode of psychosis by providing comprehensive evaluation and diagnosis, psychological treatment and medication and psycho-education for families. The idea is that early diagnosis and intervention can keep an initial psychotic break from becoming full-blown schizophrenia. “We [More]

November 1st, 2010

Report shows that older adults are abusing drugs

By Catherine Robertson Souter

Drug addiction is often thought to be the scourge of the young. A new report, however, shows that substance abuse is becoming a greater concern among Americans over 50 years old. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), approximately 118,495 emergency room visits in 2008 involved illicit drug use by older adults. Cocaine was the most common drug (63 percent), followed by heroin (26.5 percent), marijuana (18.5 percent), and stimulants (5.3 percent). In a recent report, SAMSHA said that the number of admissions for substance abuse treatment in older Americans has more than doubled since the [More]

November 1st, 2010

Cough medicines to stay available

By Nan Shnitzler

A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel voted 15 to nine to continue to allow cough medicines containing dextromethorphan (DXM) to be sold over the counter despite recreational use that sends thousands of people to emergency rooms every year. Approved by the FDA in 1958, DXM is found in more than 120 over-the-counter cough medicines like Robitussin, Coricidin, Dimetapp and generics. Taken at recommended doses, DXM can occasionally cause a mild high. But abusers consume it in doses 10 to 20 times higher for euphoriant and hallucinogenic effects, referred to as “robo-tripping” or “tussing.” The DEA, which requested the FDA’s [More]

November 1st, 2010

Q&A: Spotlight shines on investigative psychology

By Catherine Robertson Souter

A brutal murder. An overwhelmed and understaffed police force. A vicious killer that no one can pinpoint. No one, that is, until the investigative psychologist comes on board. Then with a perusal of the case files, she points out a seemingly innocuous piece of evidence, one that nobody had paid much attention to and suddenly the case is solved. Of course it was the boyfriend. Flip the channels on television any night of the week and you will find some version of this scenario playing out. But is it realistic? Art does imitate life in some ways. Just like in [More]

October 20th, 2010

Q&A: Human trafficking is focus of cross cultural work

By Catherine Robertson Souter

It shouldn’t happen but it does. Human trafficking is one crime that we imagine happens in the shadowy alleys or dirt poor towns of third world countries, where local police turn a blind eye or, worse, participate in the enslavement of millions. Men, women and children are kidnapped or, more commonly, enticed into traveling with the traffickers and find themselves being forced into prostitution or labor far from home with no options and no way of escape. While it may be worse in other countries, it does, sadly happen here as well. With a promise of a job in the [More]

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