October 1st, 2017

Adolescent suicide rates on the rise

By Catherine Robertson Souter

Suicide rates among adolescents have shown a steady increase over the past decade, according to a report put out by the Centers for Disease Control. The rates among girls ages 15-19 rose more substantially than those of boys, more than doubling between 2007 and 2015. Rates for teen boys increased during the same period by 30 percent. The CDC released an updated breakdown of suicide rates in early August showing the trend for suicide among all teens over the past 40 years. The male rate tends to be far higher than for females. In 1975, for instance, the CDC reported [More]

October 1st, 2017

Study: Smartphone use linked to mental health distress

By Susan Gonsalves

College students with high smartphone use report higher levels of depression, anxiety and loneliness, poorer sleep quality and difficulties fulfilling their obligations as a student, according to a study at Assumption College, a small liberal arts school located in Worcester, Mass. Lead authors Adam Volungis, Ph.D. and Maria Kalpidou, Ph.D., emphasized that while the research shows a correlation between phone use and indicators of general symptoms of distress, no causal link was concluded. One hundred and fifty college students, 83 percent of whom were female, filled out a series of questionnaires using a range of assessment tools such as the [More]

October 1st, 2017

Educational Treatment Center uses animals to reach teens

By Eileen Weber

Six years ago, Wes and Sue Horton, LMFT were looking for a change. They found it at Ironwood, a residential treatment center and private, co-educational school for teens in Morrill, Maine. With professional backgrounds in therapy and healthcare, the Hortons took over the facility adding more professional staff and revamping the program for families in crisis. Ironwood concentrates on the behavioral, therapeutic and educational needs of up to 45 students aged 13 to 18 for a nine- to 12-month period. Teens are admitted for issues ranging from addiction, depression and anxiety to self-harm, oppositional defiance and ADHD. “Self-esteem develops by [More]

October 1st, 2017

Brattleboro Retreat approves strategic plan

By Pamela Berard

Responding to challenges facing mental health and addiction treatment providers nationwide, Brattleboro Retreat of Vermont has approved a three-year strategic plan. President and CEO Louis Josephson, Ph.D., said Brattleboro Retreat is facing increasing demand for services in an era of falling or flat reimbursement rates. The new strategic plan takes on these and other challenges with a four-pronged approach: Focus on clinical excellence; Achieve financial stability; Increase accountability; and Re-envision the campus. When crafting the plan, the Retreat cast a broad net in talking to various stakeholders. “That feedback did sync up with what we are trying to do,” Josephson [More]

October 1st, 2017

Crotched Mountain after-school program designed to engage students

By Phyllis Hanlon

This past July, Crotched Mountain School launch-ed a carefully thought out after-school program for its students, designed to engage them physically, emotionally, socially and psychologically. The program offers structure and predictability for both residential and day students, while preparing them for life beyond the classroom. David Johnson, director of marketing communications, explained that Crotched Mountain has 70 residential students and 25 day students who hail from across the country. Children with a diagnosis on the autism spectrum comprise about half of the student body, while the remaining students have emotional behavior disorders, some with medication needs. “Most of our students [More]

October 1st, 2017

School emphasizes closeness, mentoring

By Catherine Robertson Souter

A fresh start can do wonders. For children with a history of behavioral or mental health issues, accumulated diagnoses can seem like a heavy weight to carry. The opportunity to start anew in a residential program like the Wediko School in Windsor, New Hampshire, may feel like a lifeline. Set on an idyllic 450-acre, lakeside property, Wediko prides itself on a strong culture of community and a dedicated staff whose goal, said Kim Guest, Psy.D, director of the school, is to help middle and high school-aged boys discover who they are beneath the labels with which they have come to [More]

October 1st, 2017

“Psychoeducational Assessment and Intervention for Ethnic Minority Children”

By James K Luiselli EdD ABPP BCBA-D

“Psychoeducational Assessment and Intervention for Ethnic Minority Children” Edited by Scott L. Graves, Jr., and Jamilia J. Blake American Psychological Association Washington, D.C., 2016   Authors compare standards, offer historical perspective Reviewed by James K. Luiselli, Ed.D., ABPP, BCBA-D Public schools within the United States continue to embrace racial and ethnic diversity among the student population. Notably, there are guidelines for multicultural education which continue to expand and evolve with variable success and research supported effectiveness. This book is one of several publications in the Applying Psychology in the Schools series produced by the American Psychological Association. The purpose of [More]

October 1st, 2017

“Innovative Investigations of Language in Autism Spectrum Disorder”

By Kerry Morrison, Psy.D

“Innovative Investigations of Language in Autism Spectrum Disorder” Edited by Letitia R. Naigles American Psychological Association Washington, D.C., 2017   Authors provide insights about language’s role in ASD Reviewed by Kerry Morrison, Psy.D. As any clinician can attest, the diagnoses of neurodevelopmental disorders such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have been on the rise for the last 10-20 years. What was once a very uncommon diagnosis for those working with children in outpatient or school settings, has now become a mainstay. Yet, the understanding of the ASD diagnosis and how language fits into it is a hotly debated issue among [More]

October 1st, 2017

My view of our eclipse summer

By Alan Bodnar Ph.D.

It was the summer of the great solar eclipse, the first total eclipse of the sun visible in the United States since 1979 and the first to traverse the entire country in more than a century. Here in New England, only about 60 percent of the sun was blocked out by the moon’s shadow. While we didn’t have what observers described as the other-worldly experience of totality, we were treated to enough of a show to justify the hype that the event generated. When I look back on this summer of the great solar eclipse, I will remember the view [More]

August 18th, 2017

Demand exists for multicultural care

By Phyllis Hanlon

After Congress passed the Refugee Act of 1980, which created the Federal Refugee Resettlement Program, three million refugees came to this country. Additionally, 43.3 million immigrants were settled in the U.S. in 2015, according to American Community Survey data. This influx of individuals from other countries is creating awareness within the psychological community for a broader understanding of diverse needs and how to deliver appropriate and effective mental health care. Martin R. Pierre, Ph.D., member of the Massachusetts Psychological Association board of directors, co-chair of its Committee on Ethnic Minority Affairs, and staff psychologist at the Brandeis University Counseling Center, [More]

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