June 1st, 2016

Postpartum depression in new dads: under-diagnosed and under-treated

By Phyllis Hanlon

Since the early 1990s there has been a growing body of research drawing attention to and appreciation of postpartum depression in new dads, according to Shannon Erisman, Ph.D., director of the Day Program at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island. She explained that the birth of a baby represents a huge role transition, especially for first time parents. For males, the transition may be especially difficult, particularly if they’ve had prior episodes of depression and are younger at the time of the birth. “Men who are younger than 25 are socially deprived, have less support and are at greater [More]

June 1st, 2016

Telehealth coverage expands in Massachusetts

By Janine Weisman

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts was expected to notify its provider network on May 15 of its plans to expand telehealth coverage starting this summer. On Jan. 1, the largest private health plan in Massachusetts started covering diagnostic evaluations and psychotherapy for 30 minutes or less conducted by videoconferencing. But as of July 1, BCBSMA will expand from two Current Procedural Terminology codes to seven for covering diagnostic evaluations and 30, 45, and 60 minute sessions of psychotherapy with patients and/or family members and such psychotherapy sessions when performed with an evaluation and management service. The telehealth coverage announcement [More]

June 1st, 2016

Telehealth CBT assists breast cancer survivors with memory problems

By Janine Weisman

Specialized cognitive behavioral therapy delivered via telehealth reduced memory problems and anxiety for breast cancer survivors living in Maine in a new study published online May 2. The small-scale study published in Cancer, the peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, is the first randomized controlled trial to use telecommunications technology to evaluate the treatment of chemotherapy-related cognitive dysfunction with an active control condition. And it shows promise in supporting large cancer center survivorship programs as the number of people living with a cancer diagnosis in the U.S. continues to increase. While the study had only 47 participants, about 75 [More]

June 1st, 2016

U.S. ranks 13th in World Happiness Report

By Rivkela Brodsky

In the latest World Happiness Report – an update released to coincide with International Day of Happiness on March 20, just 11 months after the 2015 report came out – the United States ranks 13 among 157 countries listed in the report. Coming in at the top at number one was Denmark, followed by Switzerland, Iceland, Norway, Finland, Canada, Netherlands, New Zealand, Australia, Sweden, Israel, Austria, and then the United States, which came in just above Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, Germany, Brazil, Belgium, Ireland, and Luxembourg to round out the top twenty. Burundi ranked last at 157 after Syria, Togo, [More]

June 1st, 2016

Missed appointments handled in various ways

By Catherine Robertson Souter

It can be a tricky situation. When a client misses an appointment or calls to cancel too late for their spot to be re-filled, how should a clinician handle it? For a psychologist, especially one in private practice, missed appointments create a dilemma. On one hand, the therapy relationship can be a delicate one, based on trust and a sense of partnership. On the other hand, a missed appointment means wasted time and a loss of income for the psychologist and a disruption of care for the client. “If you are a psychologist, especially one in independent practice,” said Gerald [More]

June 1st, 2016

Program helps new mothers and pregnant women

By Pamela Berard

With an increasing national focus on early identification of depression in pregnancy or postpartum, the Day Hospital at Women & Infants Hospital in Providence, R.I., continues to help treat expectant or new moms in a unique setting. The Day Hospital opened in 2000 as the nation’s first perinatal partial hospital program treating pregnant women and new mothers (joined by their babies) with depression, anxiety or other emotional distress. The concept of having the newborn accompany the mother to treatment was a new one when the program began, and is a cornerstone of treatment at the Day Hospital. “We like to [More]

June 1st, 2016

Stress in America Survey 2015: the impact of discrimination

By Phyllis Hanlon

The American Psychological Association conducted its tenth annual Stress in America survey and released results in March. This particular survey focused on the impact discrimination has on an individual’s stress level. A total of 3,361 participants took part in the online survey. The results indicated that 69 percent or seven in 10 adults, report having experienced discrimination; 61 percent reported day-to-day discrimination. According to the survey, minorities experienced high levels of discrimination on an everyday basis, i.e., 76 percent of Black adults, 74 percent of Asian, 72 percent of Hispanics and 81 percent of American Indian/Alaska Natives. Thirty percent of [More]

June 1st, 2016

Report: Suicide deaths on the rise

By Rivkela Brodsky

Suicide deaths in the U.S. have increased from 1999 to 2014 for both genders aged 10-74, according to a new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Suicide is increasing against the backdrop of generally declining mortality and is currently one of the 10 leading causes of death overall,” reads the report. “This report highlights increases in suicide mortality from 1999 through 2014 and shows that while the rate increased almost steadily over the period, the average annual percent increase was greater for the second half of this period (2006–2014) than for the first half (1999–2006).” The increase [More]

June 1st, 2016

Summer camp provides emotional support

By Pamela Berard

A residential summer camp in Vermont supports children with a range of social, behavioral and emotional needs. Camp Daybreak, offered to boys and girls 8-11 for one week in August at a Vermont campsite, was founded in 1961. The camp is now a direct service program of the Vermont Association for Mental Health and Addiction Recovery and operates as a strengths-based experience focused on meeting the needs of the young people who attend. Dan Osman, Camp Daybreak director, said the young campers have a range of needs. “In mental health, there’s no cookie-cutter answer; no one fits a specific mold,” [More]

June 1st, 2016

Stepfamily relationships at heart of psychologist’s research

By Catherine Robertson Souter

According to the Pew Research Center, 42 percent of American adults are in some form of a blended family. Sound surprising? What is more surprising, according to Patricia Papernow, Ed.D, is how much research has been done on the health of stepfamily relationships and how little of that research has gotten out to the public. Papernow, a specialist in stepfamily relationships with a private clinical and consulting practice in Hudson, Mass., has spent her career teaching stepfamilies how to better interact and teaching therapists how to help them. The author of two books on the subject including “Striving and Surviving [More]

Site Developed by SteerPoint Design