Articles, Leading Stories

January 1st, 2017

Prescriptive authority among VPA legislative initiatives

By Rivkela Brodsky

The Vermont Psychological Association has three main areas of focus for the 2017 state legislative session: healthcare reform, insurance coverage of telehealth services and prescriptive authority for psychology doctorates. Healthcare Reform The nonprofit professional association founded in 1950 that represents psychologists in the state of Vermont is working to make sure psychologists and other mental health providers are fairly reimbursed in new payment reform systems being developed in the state, said Rick Barnett, Psy.D., MSCP, past president and legislative chair for the Vermont Psychological Association. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services recently approved the Vermont All-Payer Accountable Care Organization [More]

January 1st, 2017

New Hampshire prepares bills for filing

By Catherine Robertson Souter

While other New England states may have their legislative agenda set for the coming year, things work slightly differently in New Hampshire. With the third largest legislative body in the world, behind only the British Parliament and the U.S. Congress, the state’s constitution has had to create a unique system for creating bills because of the sheer number of state legislators (400 representatives, 24 senators). The state has one representative for approximately every 3,300 residents, thereby giving each individual greater access to their state reps but also increasing the number of individual petitions that can be brought before the House. [More]

January 1st, 2017

Budget climate defines legislative agenda

By Janine Weisman

With a projected $1.3 billion deficit in the fiscal 2018 state budget, Connecticut lawmakers will again face the prospect of raising taxes and fees and cutting services when they convene in Hartford Jan. 4 for the General Assembly’s 2017 session. So, it’s on purpose that the Connecticut Psychological Association has not developed a long list of priorities for its legislative agenda for the new year. Last year saw cuts in state spending across all sectors, including mental health and human services. “I think everyone’s in more of a defensive mode right now, protecting what we have and paying attention to [More]

January 1st, 2017

Former hotel becomes recovery center

By Phyllis Hanlon

On October 17, Recovery Centers of America (RCA), based in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, opened a 48-bed drug and rehabilitation facility in the former Wachusett Village Inn in Westminster, Mass. According to Brad Greenstein, New England regional director and CEO, the facility, which is called the New England Center for Addiction, a Recovery Centers of America company, contains 16 detox beds and 32 residential beds. “The center will serve adults 18 and older and offers specialized clinical programs for young adults to geriatric patients,” he said. “We will be working primarily with people who have substance abuse disorders, but our [More]

January 1st, 2017

Internship program eliminated

By Pamela Berard

The Connecticut Psychological Association is asking the state Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) to reconsider its decision to eliminate the Connecticut Valley Psychology Internship Program, which was first established in 1947. Clinical psychologist Traci Cipriano, JD, Ph.D, CPA’s director of professional affairs and a graduate of the internship herself, said that the CPA’s President-elect, Christopher Rigling, Psy.D., MBA – also a graduate of the internship – immediately initiated CPA’s advocacy efforts to save the program when he learned about the state’s decision to eliminate it in 2017 as part of budget cuts. Cipriano said the CPA has [More]

January 1st, 2017

Jane Tillman, Ph.D., ABPP, explores impact of client suicides

By Catherine Robertson Souter

When someone dies by a person’s own hand, the loss deeply affects each of those closest to him or her. What may often be missed, however, is how that loss also affects the therapist trained to keep this suicide from happening. In the popular mind, it may seem inappropriate to be concerned with the professional on the sidelines after a successful suicide attempt, but for the human being behind that degree, a death can have many repercussions both professionally and personally. After a colleague experienced the shock and trauma of a patient dying by suicide, Jane Tillman, Ph.D., ABPP, the [More]

December 1st, 2016

Clinicians help adults with ADHD

By Phyllis Hanlon

Attention deficit disorder or attention deficit hyperactive disorder is most often associated with young children and adolescents. But symptoms that manifest in childhood sometimes persist into adulthood and, in other cases, signs first initiate well past the early years. The Anxiety and Depression Society of America reports that approximately 60 percent of children with ADHD in the United States carry the diagnosis into adulthood; that amounts to four percent or eight million adults. Fewer than 20 percent of adults with ADHD have been diagnosed or treated, according to the Society. David D. Nowell, Ph.D., private practitioner with offices in Worcester, [More]

December 1st, 2016

MPA sets legislative agenda

By Janine Weisman

Anti-clawback legislation, telehealth parity and protecting continuity of care will be the top three priorities for the Massachusetts Psychological Association when the next session of the State Legislature begins Jan. 4, 2017. Legislative sessions run for two years in Massachusetts. At the beginning of each new session, legislators file bills to be considered during that session. Each session sees an estimated 6,000 bills filed in the House of Representatives and 2,000 in the Senate. All bills must be filed by mid-January. “We’re kind of starting with a clean slate in each January of an odd numbered year,” MPA Executive Director [More]

December 1st, 2016

Initiative brings services to young children with trauma

By Pamela Berard

A new grant will help bridge a gap for services to very young children in Connecticut suffering from exposure to trauma. The Child Health and Development Institute (CHDI) was awarded a five-year, $2 million grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration to expand services to young children in Connecticut suffering from exposure to trauma, including violence, abuse, chronic neglect, loss of a family member, serious accidents and illness. The grant will fund the Early Childhood Trauma Collaborative initiative. Led by CHDI, the collaborative will partner with the Office of Early Childhood, the Department of Children and Families, [More]

December 1st, 2016

Program helps military families cope with alcohol abuse

By Rivkela Brodsky

Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, Mass., are in year three of a four-year grant to study and provide military couples with alcohol and relationship counseling. “We took an alcohol couple behavioral therapy treatment model that we developed at Rutgers [University] over 25 years with civilian samples and got funding from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism to adapt it for military families,” said Elizabeth Epstein, Ph.D., psychologist, and professor of psychiatry at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. She is a principal investigator of the study along with David Smelson, Psy.D., psychologist and [More]

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