Book Reviews, Articles

May 1st, 2010

Medical Illness and Positive Life Change: Can Crisis Lead to Personal Transformation?

By James K Luiselli EdD ABPP BCBA-D

Edited by Crystal L. Park, Suzanne C. Lechner, Michael H. Antoni, and Annette L. Stanton American Psychological Association Washington, D.C., 2009 Stress-related growth examined in challenging work Reviewed by James K. Luiselli, Ed.D., ABPP, BCBA-D Medical illnesses and chronic health problems are the focus of this book but not from a negative or fatalistic perspective. Rather, the book examines positive life changes as sequelae to serious illness. Akin to positive psychology, the concepts and applications detailed in the book have been described interchangeably as stress-related growth, posttraumatic growth and benefit finding. The editors assembled 12 chapters that are based on [More]

April 1st, 2010

Polarities of Experience: Relatedness and Self-Definition in Personality Development, Psychopathology, and the Therapeutic Process

By Paul Efthim PhD

“Polarities of Experience: Relatedness and Self-Definition in Personality Development, Psychopathology, and the Therapeutic Process” By Sidney J. Blatt American Psychological Association Washington, D.C., 2008   Author displays depth of knowledge Reviewed By Paul Efthim, Ph.D. Yale psychologist Sidney Blatt is a phenomenon. Over the course of a distinguished research career spanning five decades, Blatt has churned out more than 200 scholarly publications. Best known for research on depression, schizophrenia and personality development, he also trained as a psychoanalyst. His work has been praised for its theoretical and clinical depth as well as its methodological rigor. Blatt’s most recent book is [More]

April 1st, 2010

Instant Psychopharmacology

By James K Luiselli EdD ABPP BCBA-D

“Instant Psychopharmacology” By Ronald J. Diamond, M.D. W.W. Norton & Company, Inc. New York, N.Y., 2009  Medications thoroughly examined in useful book Reviewed By James K. Luiselli, Ed.D., ABPP, BCBA-D Mental health professionals who are non-physicians should be knowledgeable about psychotropic medications. Indeed, pharmacotherapy is often used in conjunction with psychosocial intervention. Ronald J. Diamond, M.D. writes that the premise of his book, “is that medications will be most useful if the people taking them and the non-medical clinicians with whom they work know as much as possible about what medications can do to help and what problems medications can [More]

March 1st, 2010

Treating Substance Use Disorders with Adaptive Continuing Care

By James K Luiselli EdD ABPP BCBA-D

Treating Substance Use Disorders with Adaptive Continuing Care By James R. McKay American Psychological Association Washington, D.C., 2009  Book’s focus will resonate with scientist-practitioners Reviewed By James K. Luiselli, Ed.D., ABPP, BCBA-D Some people who have substance use disorders (alcohol and drugs) respond positively to brief therapeutic intervention. However, other people are not able to sustain sobriety without intensive long-term treatment. As psychologist James R. McKay states in the introduction to his book, “There is now widespread acceptance that addiction is often a chronic problem characterized by increased vulnerability to relapse that can persist over many years.” McKay wrote the [More]

February 1st, 2010

The Glass Ceiling in the 21st Century: Understanding Barriers to Gender Inequality

By Paul Efthim PhD

“The Glass Ceiling in the 21st Century: Understanding Barriers to Gender Inequality” Edited by Manuela Barreto, Michelle K. Ryan & Michael T. Schmitt American Psychological Association Washington, D.C., 2009 Compelling volume looks at discrimination in the workplace Reviewed By Paul Efthim, Ph.D. Recent references to the “glass ceiling” in public discourse suggest that women finally are breaking through this longstanding barrier. On the cover of the January 2 issue of the Economist, a wartime Rosie the Riveter flexes her bicep, declaring “We Did It!” An accompanying editorial notes that women now make up the majority of the American workforce, gushing [More]

February 1st, 2010

Case Studies in Emotion-Focused Treatment of Depression: A Comparison of Good and Poor Outcome

By James K Luiselli EdD ABPP BCBA-D

Case Studies in  Emotion-Focused  Treatment of  Depression:  A Comparison of Good and Poor Outcome By Jeanne C. Watson, Rhonda N. Goldman, and Leslie S. Greenberg American Psychological Association Washington, D.C., 2007 Depression treatment method examined in book Reviewed By James K. Luiselli, Ed.D., ABPP, BCBA Depression is a frequent clinical problem seen by mental health professionals. This book has to do with a specific therapeutic approach called Emotion-Focused Treatment (EFT). The theory behind EFT is that “depression arises from problems in affect regulation and results from maladaptive, blocked and unprocessed emotional experience.” Accordingly, the purpose of the book is to [More]

January 1st, 2010

Psychological and Physical Aggression in Couples: Causes and Interventions

By Paul Efthim PhD

“Psychological and Physical Aggression in Couples: Causes and Interventions” Edited by K. Daniel O’Leary and Erica M. Woodin American Psychological Association Washington, D.C., 2009 Domestic violence book helpful to clinicians By Paul Efthim, Ph.D. Do batterer intervention programs work? Not as much as we might think, according to a new book on aggression in couples. The rate at which batterer programs reduce recidivism is low, ranging between zero and five percent. Although any decrease in domestic violence is valuable, some observers argue that such programs – with their promise to reeducate offenders – inadvertently engender a false sense of hope [More]

January 1st, 2010

Preventing Partner Violence: Research and Evidence-Based Intervention Strategies

By James K Luiselli EdD ABPP BCBA-D

“Preventing Partner Violence: Research and Evidence-Based Intervention Strategies” Edited by Daniel J. Whitaker and John R. Lutzker American Psychological Association Washington, D.C., 2009 Book alerts professional community about partner violence Reviewed By James K. Luiselli, Ed.D., ABPP, BCBA ntimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious public health problem. Whereas the earliest work on IPV focused on the harmful actions of men towards their female partners, the current clinical and research perspective is broader, including violence committed by women against men, within same-sex relationships and between adolescent partners. IPV remains a complex matter, not easily resolved, but better understood thanks to [More]