Articles, Leading Stories

January 1st, 2017

Election prompts anxiety, confusion

By Phyllis Hanlon

In the wake of what many print, broadcast and social media outlets have called one of the “most divisive” political campaigns in recent memory, a mixture of emotions ranging from anger to confusion are impacting the country’s psychological health. Some clinicians are seeing an increase in calls for help, while research psychologists attempt to explain the complicated after-effects of the election. In the weeks since the election, Jason Evan Mihalko, Psy.D., private practitioner in Cambridge, Mass., whose patients include many immigrants, people of color and trauma survivors, has received more calls than usual. “It could be the time of year [More]

January 1st, 2017

APA president-elect named

By Janine Weisman

Near the end of the monthly psychology training committee meeting at Boston Children’s Hospital last November, Jessica Henderson Daniel, Ph.D., ABPP, gave the floor to a senior supervising psychologist who said her patients and those of her interns seemed especially anxious after the presidential election a week earlier. The 25 people in the conference room all realized they had similar experiences and wanted to talk more. “You could sort of feel that we were quite engaged with this topic but we didn’t have enough time,” said Eugene J. D’Angelo, Ph.D., ABPP, chief of the Division of Psychology. “There was a [More]

January 1st, 2017

Prescriptive authority among VPA legislative initiatives

By Rivkela Brodsky

The Vermont Psychological Association has three main areas of focus for the 2017 state legislative session: healthcare reform, insurance coverage of telehealth services and prescriptive authority for psychology doctorates. Healthcare Reform The nonprofit professional association founded in 1950 that represents psychologists in the state of Vermont is working to make sure psychologists and other mental health providers are fairly reimbursed in new payment reform systems being developed in the state, said Rick Barnett, Psy.D., MSCP, past president and legislative chair for the Vermont Psychological Association. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services recently approved the Vermont All-Payer Accountable Care Organization [More]

January 1st, 2017

New Hampshire prepares bills for filing

By Catherine Robertson Souter

While other New England states may have their legislative agenda set for the coming year, things work slightly differently in New Hampshire. With the third largest legislative body in the world, behind only the British Parliament and the U.S. Congress, the state’s constitution has had to create a unique system for creating bills because of the sheer number of state legislators (400 representatives, 24 senators). The state has one representative for approximately every 3,300 residents, thereby giving each individual greater access to their state reps but also increasing the number of individual petitions that can be brought before the House. [More]

January 1st, 2017

Budget climate defines legislative agenda

By Janine Weisman

With a projected $1.3 billion deficit in the fiscal 2018 state budget, Connecticut lawmakers will again face the prospect of raising taxes and fees and cutting services when they convene in Hartford Jan. 4 for the General Assembly’s 2017 session. So, it’s on purpose that the Connecticut Psychological Association has not developed a long list of priorities for its legislative agenda for the new year. Last year saw cuts in state spending across all sectors, including mental health and human services. “I think everyone’s in more of a defensive mode right now, protecting what we have and paying attention to [More]

January 1st, 2017

Former hotel becomes recovery center

By Phyllis Hanlon

On October 17, Recovery Centers of America (RCA), based in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, opened a 48-bed drug and rehabilitation facility in the former Wachusett Village Inn in Westminster, Mass. According to Brad Greenstein, New England regional director and CEO, the facility, which is called the New England Center for Addiction, a Recovery Centers of America company, contains 16 detox beds and 32 residential beds. “The center will serve adults 18 and older and offers specialized clinical programs for young adults to geriatric patients,” he said. “We will be working primarily with people who have substance abuse disorders, but our [More]

January 1st, 2017

Internship program eliminated

By Pamela Berard

The Connecticut Psychological Association is asking the state Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) to reconsider its decision to eliminate the Connecticut Valley Psychology Internship Program, which was first established in 1947. Clinical psychologist Traci Cipriano, JD, Ph.D, CPA’s director of professional affairs and a graduate of the internship herself, said that the CPA’s President-elect, Christopher Rigling, Psy.D., MBA – also a graduate of the internship – immediately initiated CPA’s advocacy efforts to save the program when he learned about the state’s decision to eliminate it in 2017 as part of budget cuts. Cipriano said the CPA has [More]

January 1st, 2017

Jane Tillman, Ph.D., ABPP, explores impact of client suicides

By Catherine Robertson Souter

When someone dies by a person’s own hand, the loss deeply affects each of those closest to him or her. What may often be missed, however, is how that loss also affects the therapist trained to keep this suicide from happening. In the popular mind, it may seem inappropriate to be concerned with the professional on the sidelines after a successful suicide attempt, but for the human being behind that degree, a death can have many repercussions both professionally and personally. After a colleague experienced the shock and trauma of a patient dying by suicide, Jane Tillman, Ph.D., ABPP, the [More]

January 1st, 2017

“Mindfulness-Based Therapy for Insomnia”

By James K Luiselli EdD ABPP BCBA-D

“Mindfulness-Based Therapy for Insomnia” By Jason C. Ong American Psychological Association Washington, D.C., 2017   Prevalence of insomnia makes book a valuable resource   Reviewed by James K. Luiselli, Ed.D., ABPP, BCBA-D Interest in mindfulness and mindfulness-based practices have increased in recent years. Some of the earliest mindfulness applications, with good evidence support, are mindfulness-based stress reduction and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy. Mindfulness is also an active component of third generation cognitive-behavioral treatment such as dialectical behavior therapy and acceptance and commitment therapy. This book describes the principles and procedures of a new treatment program called mindfulness-based therapy for insomnia. Psychologist [More]

January 1st, 2017

“The Brain’s Way of Healing”

By Kerry Morrison, Psy.D

“The Brain’s Way of Healing” By Norman Doidge, M.D. Viking, Penguin Group New York, N.Y., 2015   Cutting edge information included in book about brain   Reviewed by Kerry Morrison, Psy.D. Scientists have recently documented that the brain is plastic. Neuroplasticity is a property of the brain that enables it to change its own structure in response to activity and mental experience, according to the book’s author, Norman Doidge. Brain cells are constantly communicating with each other electrically to form and reform connections. This process is a unique pathway for healing brain injuries and conditions thought to be permanent and [More]

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