June 1st, 2014

Is talk therapy a thing of the past?

By Rivkela Brodsky

College students are turning away from talk therapy and toward medication for anxiety and depression, according to a recent study. “The major finding of this review was that attitudes toward seeking mental health services have become increasingly negative, in more or less a linear manner, among American university students over the past 40 years,” according to the study published in the March issue of Clinical Psychology Review. Researchers looked at published studies that used the ATSPPHS (Attitudes Toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help Scale) on a sample of American college students and conducted a cross-temporal meta-analysis, finding that “help-seeking attitudes have [More]

June 1st, 2014

Jury’s still out on omission of bereavement exclusion

By Susan Gonsalves

One of the most controversial changes made last year was the removal of the “bereavement” exclusion from the major depressive disorder (MDD) diagnosis in DSM-5. Proponents of the change argue that the removal does not “medicalize” grief, stigmatize bereaved individuals, imply that grief transforms into depression after two weeks or lead to un-necessary prescribing of anti-depressants. Instead, they feel the elimination allows all people with MDD to receive care without ruling out the existence of interacting causes. Opponents, however, believe the change was motivated by political and financial agendas, confuses grief and prolonged grief disorder with bereavement and is not [More]

June 1st, 2014

Providers eye ‘Beth Israel experiment’ on sharing notes

By Janine Weisman

Clinicians at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston are venturing into unchartered territory: They’re posting outpatient mental health progress notes in patients’ electronic medical records so summaries of treatment sessions can be read at home. The Veterans Health Administration began making patients’ progress notes available via its online portal, My HealtheVet, in January 2013. But most hospitals hesitate to share such notes out of concern patients may misinterpret them. On March 1, all 15 of Beth Israel’s Department of Psychiatry staff agreed to share psychiatry notes with 10 percent of their ambulatory caseloads – approximately 350 patients – as [More]

June 1st, 2014

DSM-5 changes: controversy continues to swirl

By Phyllis Hanlon

The release of the DSM-5 launched a firestorm of criticism over some of the added diagnoses. Two in particular – premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and disruptive mood dysregulation (DMDD) – have generated much debate among mental health professionals. PMDD was included in DSM-IV as depressive diagnosis not otherwise specified (NOS) and also listed in the index; the DSM-5 elevated PMDD to the front of the book. Although premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is common, the condition presents with more physical rather than mental symptoms, says Joan Chrisler, Ph.D., professor of psychology at Connecticut College, and doesn’t qualify as a diagnosable illness. “In [More]

June 1st, 2014

Research shows patient involvement in care helpful for minorities

By Rivkela Brodsky

A little training can go a long way for mental health patients – especially for ethnic or racial minorities, according to a recent study by Harvard Medical School researchers. According to the article, published in the April issue of JAMA Psychiatry, previous studies have shown that patient involvement in their care is important for receiving better quality of care, especially for minorities who “may hold traditional role expectations against participation in clinical encounters and may leave treatment when services do not meet their needs.” Minority patients are less likely to state concerns, ask questions about medications, or seek information from [More]

June 1st, 2014

Medicaid program expands in N.H.

By Catherine Robertson Souter

After tabling a vote on the subject at the end of last year, the New Hampshire legislature has passed a bill that will officially expand the state’s Medicaid program. The plan was passed first by the Republican-controlled Senate and then by the Democratic-held House. The bill, signed into law by Gov. Maggie Hassan on March 26, will take advantage of federal funding earmarked by the Affordable Care Act to expand coverage to adults who earn up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level (approximately $16,000 for a single adult). The federal government offered to pay 100 percent of the [More]

June 1st, 2014

Bill for more mental health benefits vetoed

By Howard Newman

A bill that would have extended mental health benefits for young adults was passed by both houses of the Maine legislature and then vetoed by Republican Gov. Paul R. LePage on April 29. Maine Bill LD 1367, sponsored by state Rep. Anne Graham (D-No. Yarmouth), carried provisions for an Assertive Community Treatment plan that would have covered adults through age 26. The original version of the bill called for coverage by MaineCare (the state’s Medicaid program) as well as private insurers. It was later amended to place responsibility for this care on the state’s Dept. of Health and Human Services [More]

June 1st, 2014

ICD-10 conversion delayed

By Catherine Robertson Souter

In a surprising turn of events, after the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services had sworn there would be no extension to the deadline for the conversion to the ICD-10 diagnostic and procedural codes, the U.S. Congress recently passed a bill that included a one-year extension to the launch. In March, the legislature passed a hotly debated bill designed to temporarily address the problem of Medicare cuts for physicians. The ICD-10 delay was added as a one line side item. The ICD-10 is the latest edition of the International Classification of Diseases, a coding system created by the World Health [More]

June 1st, 2014

Report: Greater integration, communication would benefit needs

By Pamela Berard

Vermont has a good framework in place to address the mental health and substance use needs of students but would benefit from increased communication among state agencies and greater integration and coordination with community and home-based services and supports. So says a report exploring the delivery of school-based mental health and substance services. The report – issued jointly by the Agency of Education and the Agency of Human Services, as a result of Act No. 68 of 2013 (An Act Relating to School-Based Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services) – was based on data from a survey sent to Vermont [More]

June 1st, 2014

TAC survey on inmate treatment: New England falls short

By Phyllis Hanlon

In April, the Treatment Advocacy Center (TAC) released its findings from a national survey that examined the treatment administered to individuals with a mental illness who are living in state prisons and county jails. The report shines a negative light on the situation, especially in New England. According to the survey, in 2012 prisons and jails housed an estimated 356,000 inmates with severe mental illness, while public hospitals had 35,000 patients with severe mental illness. The survey explains that incarceration instead of hospitalization leads to associated problems including jail/prison overcrowding, behavioral issues, physical attacks, victimization, mental deterioration, isolation, jail/prison suicides, [More]

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