February 1st, 2015

Prison population in R.I. largely comprised of mentally ill people

By Rivkela Brodsky

Of Rhode Island’s more than 3,000 prison population, approximately 500 are living with a serious mental illness, said Susan Jacobsen, MA, LMHC, executive director of the Mental Health Association of Rhode Island. That figure is calculated by taking the incidence of mental illness in the general prison population (14-17 percent) and multiplying it by the Rhode Island prison population, Jacobsen said. “It certainly is the case in many communities in Rhode Island that local [jails] are the largest mental health providers de facto,” she said. “They can’t turn anybody away.” She added that the state hospital has fewer than 140 [More]

February 1st, 2015

Initiative seeks to strengthen children’s wellness

By Pamela Berard

An initiative in New Haven, Conn., aims to strengthen the integration and collaboration between physical and mental health services and increase early interventions and access to services in the city’s Dwight neighborhood. The goal is to duplicate the efforts throughout the state. The state Department of Children and Families, with support from the Department of Public Health, is receiving a $4 million, five-year federal grant to promote the wellness of young children from birth to age 8 in New Haven. The Elm City Project Launch will address the physical, social, emotional, cognitive and behavioral aspects of child development, using a [More]

February 1st, 2015

APA consumer guide promotes parity awareness

By Janine Weisman

Four percent of Americans know there is a federal mental health parity law that requires insurance coverage of services for mental health and substance use disorders comparable to physical health coverage. Such low public awareness measured in an online survey commissioned last year by the American Psychological Association has prompted efforts to educate consumers and policymakers about the existence of the Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act. Passed in 2008 and taking effect Jan. 1, 2011, the mental health parity law prohibits annual limits on sessions and higher co-pays or deductibles for treatment of [More]

February 1st, 2015

Revamp to improve mental health area

By Catherine Robertson Souter

Natural light streams through a skylight. A dedicated shower and bathroom provides privacy. Two new safe rooms, with the ability to “swing” two more, provide a refuge from the hustle and bustle of the emergency department. For a small town Emergency Room, the newly renovated behavioral health area of the Cheshire Medical Center/Dartmouth Hitchcock Keene is seeing a renovation any bigger hospital would envy. After breaking ground last May, the hospital’s renovation project has been keeping pace with projections. The plan, approved by the New Hampshire State Department of Health and Human Services, will see only a slight expansion in [More]

February 1st, 2015

Assumption College promotes collaborative research

By Phyllis Hanlon

Faculty/student research has been a long-standing practice at Assumption College in Worcester, Mass.. But during the last five to eight years the institution has increased its research opportunities for students, according to Paula Fitzpatrick, Ph.D., professor of psychology and department chair at the college. Fitzpatrick attributes the renewed interest in collaborative research, in part, to a newly designed honors program launched in 2009. “The college created a summer fellowship where students could work on research projects with faculty. Additionally, the psychology department worked with administration to find funds for students who are not part of the honors program to conduct [More]

February 1st, 2015

Report: Pediatricians can play crucial role

By Pamela Berard

Pediatricians can play a key role in helping to identify mental health issues in new mothers, according to a report released by the Child Health and Development Institute (CHDI) of Connecticut. Barbara Ward-Zimmerman, Ph.D., licensed child psychologist, behavioral health and primary care integration consultant and one of the authors of the report, “Addressing Maternal Mental Health in the Pediatric Medical Home” said OB/GYNs should also be screening for mental health issues at regular intervals. She said it also makes sense for pediatricians to play a role in identifying challenges that new moms are facing. “The earlier we identify (challenges), the [More]

February 1st, 2015

Psychologist looks at both sides of love

By Catherine Robertson Souter

In recognition of the month-long celebration of love that is February, we spoke with K. Daniel O’Leary, Ph.D., distinguished professor of clinical psychology at Stony Brook University, whose research has looked at both the positive and negative aspects of modern relationships. On one side, O’Leary and colleagues released a study in 2012 that showed that the prevalence of intense feelings of love persist longer in monogamous relationships than previously thought. On the other side, the prevalence of physical aggression between partners is also higher than one might expect, especially in newlyweds. O’Leary has written a number of books and articles [More]

February 1st, 2015

“Treatment Integrity: A Foundation for Evidence-Based Practice in Applied Psychology”

By James K Luiselli EdD ABPP BCBA-D

“Treatment Integrity: A Foundation for Evidence-Based Practice in Applied Psychology” Edited by Lisa M. Hagermoser Sanetti and Thomas R. Kratochwill American Psychological Association Washington, D.C., 2014   Hands-on approach makes book appealing Reviewed by James K. Luiselli, Ed.D., ABPP, BCBA-D Treatment integrity refers to the accuracy of procedural implementation by service providers. If practitioners such as clinicians, teachers and paraprofessional staff apply interventions inconsistently, it is not possible to properly assess whether treatment failure or less than desirable outcome is because of poor implementation or the procedures themselves. Of note, questionable treatment integrity almost always leads to sub-optimal results for [More]

February 1st, 2015

All you need is love

By Alan Bodnar Ph.D.

In the dead of winter, Valentine’s Day reminds us of the healing power of love in all of its many forms. Cut through the commercial dross of the manufactured holiday and you might be able to see acts of kindness in places you never thought to look. Avoid print and television news where stories of violence and crime predominate and see what’s happening where you spend your time every day. Take along a guidebook to orient yourself to the landscape of love and stroll the boulevards and back streets of familiar places looking for evidence that we have not forgotten [More]

January 1st, 2015

APA ethics under investigation

By Phyllis Hanlon

New York Times reporter James Risen’s new book, “Pay Any Price: Greed, Power and Endless War,” discloses the hidden costs of war on terror, shameful governmental practices and abuse of power. In this tome, Risen alleges that the American Psychological Association (APA) colluded with the Bush administration regarding torture of detainees. In response, the APA has issued several statements refuting the allegations. Rhea Farberman, executive director for communications at the APA, says that the organization is taking the allegations seriously and has engaged David H. Hoffman, an attorney with Sidley Austin LLP in Chicago, to conduct a “thorough and objective” [More]

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