June 1st, 2017

Interventions decrease post emergency room suicidal behavior

By Susan Gonsalves

Providing a range of interventions for suicidal patients beyond the standard care in emergency rooms lowered the risk of repeat attempts by 30 percent. That result came out of a large clinical trial led by Brown University and Butler Hospital psychologist Ivan Miller, Ph.D. The study, published in JAMA Psychiatry, involved 1,376 patients in eight hospital EDs who had a recent suicide attempt or ideation. The trial had three phases. The first group consisted of 497 people who received “treatment as usual,” in the emergency room from August 2010 to December 2011. The middle group was comprised of 377 individuals [More]

June 1st, 2017

Mindfulness study examines gender coping strategies

By Susan Gonsalves

Gender is a potential factor in measuring the effectiveness of mindfulness but individual differences are equally as important, according to Rahil Rojiani, co-lead author of a Brown University study that tracked student outcomes in a 12-week scholarly course on mindfulness. Data was collected over several semesters from 2008-2011, about 77 university students (36 women) enrolled in Brown’s mindfulness course that features experiential practice-based learning through meditation labs three times per week with contemplative practice from Buddhist or Daoist traditions. Students also attend weekly seminars and take part in written reflection and question and answer periods. Participants also completed questionnaires at [More]

June 1st, 2017

New director discusses binge eating, support services

By Catherine Robertson Souter

Recognizing the need for a greater focus on binge eating disorder treatment, Walden Behavioral Care recently named Kate Craigen, Ph.D., to a newly created position as clinical director, binge eating and bariatric support services. While Walden has been offering specialized binge eating disorder treatment throughout its eight locations in New England since 2003, the organization recently decided to create the position in order to better serve a rising tide of clients seeking help. Craigen, who was employed prior to the promotion as a clinician for Walden, will lead the program’s curriculum development, staff training and clinical supervision of related intensive [More]

June 1st, 2017

“When an Adult You Love Has ADHD: Professional Advice for Parents, Partners, and Siblings”

By James K Luiselli EdD ABPP BCBA-D

“When an Adult You Love Has ADHD: Professional Advice for Parents, Partners, and Siblings” By Russell A. Barkley, Ph.D. American Psychological Association Washington, D.C., 2017   Invaluable advice given about adult ADHD Reviewed by James K. Luiselli, Ed.D., ABPP, BCBA-D Russell A. Barkley is a clinical neuropsychologist with more than 40 years of experience as a researcher, therapist, consultant and teacher in the area of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. He is a recognized expert in ADHD who has written 22 books, published hundreds of professional articles, delivered scholarly presentations worldwide and been featured in many training videos, television shows and [More]

June 1st, 2017

Welcoming the stranger

By Alan Bodnar Ph.D.

In recent weeks, small signs have been springing up on the lawns of our little town, refreshingly different from the usual appeals to vote for political candidates or issues facing the community. The message in Spanish, English, and Arabic says simply, “No matter where you are from, you’re welcome in our neighborhood.” Anyone can say you are welcome, but making you actually feel welcome is something else again. Yet it’s heartening to see that the effort is underway even as decisions made at higher levels of government are restricting access to our country to millions of refugees and others who [More]

May 1st, 2017

New England battles opioid epidemic

By Phyllis Hanlon

A 2014 Health and Human Services report issued some troubling statistics for four New England states: Massachusetts leads the nation with most opioid-related visits to hospital emergency rooms – 450 for every 100,000 residents – out of 30 states providing data. Rhode Island had 298 visits; Connecticut, 255; and Vermont, 224. Efforts to address the opioid crisis have resulted in the creation of new and enhancement of existing programs at several hospitals across New England. Christopher Cutter, Ph.D., director of the chronic pain and recovery program at Silver Hill Hospital, New Canaan, Conn., reported that this 28-day program treats patients [More]

May 1st, 2017

New England states limit painkiller prescriptions

By Janine Weisman

In March 2016, Massachusetts became the first state in the nation to enact a law limiting first-time opioid medication prescriptions for adults and all opioid prescriptions for minors to a maximum of seven days, with certain exceptions. That was the same month the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published national standards recommending doctors write scripts for the “lowest effective dose” of painkillers like OxyContin, Percocet and Vicodin. The federal guidelines represented a radical departure from the longstanding practice of prescribing for two weeks or even a month’s worth of pills amid growing alarm over how highly addictive opioids [More]

May 1st, 2017

Bed reduction plan at UMass Memorial Medical Center causes outcry

By Susan Gonsalves

UMass Memorial Medical Center’s plan to convert 13 of 28 psychiatric beds to medical surgery beds has met with widespread opposition. Eric W. Dickson, M.D., president/CEO of UMass Memorial Health Care said that the hospital serves a critical role as a trauma center for patients with life threatening illnesses who are shipped there from “less comprehensive” hospitals. Transitioning the beds for life-saving surgeries is the “right decision,” for the region’s patients, he said, because as a practicing emergency physician, he has personally witnessed the “daily challenge of too few beds for the large number of critically ill people waiting to [More]

May 1st, 2017

Alita Care, LLC acquires Bournewood Health Systems

By Pamela Berard

Bournewood Health Systems of Brookline, Massachusetts, will broaden its continuum of care as a result of its recent acquisition by Alita Care, LLC, of Phoenix, Arizona, a national provider of behavioral health services with 16 differentiated programs across the country. Alita Care announced its acquisition of Bournewood in March. In addition to Bournewood, Alita also serves as the parent holding company for Meadows Behavioral Healthcare – a drug rehab and psychological trauma treatment center with a main campus in Arizona – and Sunspire Health, a national network of addiction recovery providers. Bournewood, Sunspire, and The Meadows all operate as independent [More]

May 1st, 2017

Portsmouth Regional Hospital expands involuntary admissions beds

By Pamela Berard

Responding to a greater need for inpatient services and prolonged wait times for emergency psychiatric care across the state of New Hampshire, Portsmouth Regional Hospital has expanded its number of beds for involuntary admissions. The hospital has a 30-bed Behavioral Health Unit. “About three years ago, we expanded our overall physical beds from 22 to 30,” said Justin Looser, LICSW, director of behavioral health services at Portsmouth Regional Hospital. “We started to see the need increase, both through our Emergency Department and the state. “About a year-and-a-half ago, we really started to see the backup of involuntary patients, both around [More]

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