November 1st, 2016

New England Center for Children opens research institute

By Phyllis Hanlon

In 1975, the New England Center for Children (NECC) in Southborough was founded to “transform the lives of children with autism worldwide through education, research and technology.” In the ensuing years, NECC has been successful in achieving its mission. So much so that the agency has just completed an $11 million capital campaign that funded the construction of a new research institute, which was completed in August 2016. NECC held a grand opening celebration on October 17, 2016. The capital campaign for the Autism Institute and Student Center, located on the Southborough campus, launched in 2015 and was co-chaired by [More]

November 1st, 2016

Survey: Presidential campaign takes toll on workers

By Rivkela Brodsky

The U.S. presidential campaign is taking a toll on workers, according to a recent survey by the American Psychological Association, which found one in four workers were negatively affected by political discussions at work in at least one way. “We do surveys regularly that take the pulse of the U.S. workforce. We look at topics related to people’s experience on the job,” said David Ballard, Psy.D., director of the APA’s Center for Organizational Excellence. “This year, given how heated the election has been and how much this has been consuming conversation everywhere, we thought we’d take a look at how [More]

November 1st, 2016

Research focuses on physical impacts, genetic roots of PTSD

By Susan Gonsalves

There’s a perception that posttraumatic stress disorder is something suffered by men who go to war. While that is sometimes the case, the disorder is more often experienced by civilians, often women, who have been on the receiving end of sexual and physical violence. Karestan Chase Koenen, Ph.D. has studied that population for years. A professor of psychiatric epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, her research focuses on identifying the link between trauma and physical conditions including diabetes, cardiovascular disease (heart disease and stroke), obesity and rheumatoid arthritis. Back in 2008, Koenen and colleagues began working [More]

November 1st, 2016

New MPA president outlines goals, priorities

By Catherine Robertson Souter

With experience in a number of different areas, Dawn Cisewksi, Psy.D, must have seemed like a perfect fit as the newest president for the Massachusetts Psychological Association. She has worked in academia, at a school of medicine and at a VA hospital. She has done time working in the state prison system and in private practice and currently consults for nursing homes. As an assistant teaching professor at Northeastern University, Cisewski, who took over leadership of the MPA in July after serving a year as president-elect, will continue in the position for two years. She will then act as past-president [More]

November 1st, 2016

“Forensic Evaluation and Treatment of Juveniles: Innovation and Best Practice”

By James K Luiselli EdD ABPP BCBA-D

“Forensic Evaluation and Treatment of Juveniles: Innovation and Best Practice” By Randall T. Salekin American Psychological Association Washington, D.C., 2015   Author skillfully addresses complex topic Reviewed by James K. Luiselli, Ed.D., ABPP, BCBA-D Juvenile offending is an area of heightened concern within forensic psychology. This book summarizes research and policy development with court-referred adolescents, including analysis of risk assessment, case formulation, treatment, prevention and disposition-transfer evaluations. The author, Randall T. Salekin, is a highly esteemed academic researcher and practicing clinician with an extensive record of scholarly publications. His emphasis throughout the book is on common mental health problems among [More]

November 1st, 2016

“When Your Child Hurts: Effective Strategies to Increase Comfort, Reduce Stress, and Break the Cycle of Pain”

By Kerry Morrison, Psy.D

“When Your Child Hurts: Effective Strategies to Increase Comfort, Reduce Stress, and Break the Cycle of Pain” By Rachael Coakley, Ph.D. Yale University Press New Haven, CT, 2016   Book offers valuable information on pain management Reviewed by Kerry Morrison, Psy.D. This new publication by Rachael Coakley is a gem of a book filled with easy to understand concepts, coping strategies for parents and children and creative yet useful techniques for managing pain, coping with pain-related challenges and building resilience in children with pain. This impressive, user friendly volume was a delight to read and offered critical information for both [More]

November 1st, 2016

Traveling with the eyes of faith

By Alan Bodnar Ph.D.

I thought I knew all the benefits of travel but a recent trip to England introduced me to one I had yet to consider, travel as an act of faith. In its theological meaning, faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things unseen. When I said good-bye to my checked baggage in Boston, the substance of my hope was simply that we would meet again in London the next morning. Between now and then, both of us would travel on the same two airplanes, my wife and I in a pressurized cabin, our baggage out of [More]

October 1st, 2016

Schools focus on underlying trauma

By Phyllis Hanlon

Residential schools serve as a viable alternative for children with behavioral and emotional issues not adequately addressed in a traditional academic setting. Students present with a variety of issues that range from depression and anxiety to attention deficit disorder and substance abuse and many others in between. In recent years, research and clinical care has shifted away from treating just the diagnosis and now address the underlying trauma that might be at the heart of the child’s problems. Joseph Spinazzola, Ph.D., vice president, Behavioral Health and Trauma Services at the Justice Resource Institute, professor of practice in the department of [More]

October 1st, 2016

Graduate programs fail to address torture issue

By Janine Weisman

Has the backlash against the participation of military psychologists in harsh interrogations of detainees at Guantánamo Bay Detention Center during the Bush era prompted U.S. doctoral programs in clinical psychology to do more ethics training to prepare graduate students for their careers? Not according to a new study by researchers at Lesley University, Cambridge Health Alliance/Harvard Medical School and other institutions. They sharply criticize the American Psychological Association for encouraging military psychologists to assist with interrogations and subsequently failing to require or even encourage training programs to prepare psychologists to navigate situations where there are conflicting duties to follow orders [More]

October 1st, 2016

Programs demonstrate alternative approaches to care

By Catherine Robertson Souter

We live in a rapidly evolving world where state-of-the-art quickly becomes yesterday’s news. Beyond tech developments, progress has become the hallmark of everything from efficient appliances to educational tools. The same can be said for mental health care. As health care has turned to more holistic approaches, from “prescribing” stress reduction and exercise to combining physical and mental health services under one roof, alternative methods of psychological care are also taking center stage. In some cases, a backlash against what some consider the over-prescribing of medication has fueled a turn towards clinical treatment that incorporates more community/family approaches to care. [More]

Site Developed by SteerPoint Design